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Articles by Alan & Akemi

Happy Birthday Roth IRAs

2018 marks the 21st birthday for the Roth IRA retirement account – officially marking it a young adult, ready to go out and conquer the world!  The Roth IRA was originally passed in the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 and named after then Senator William Roth of Delaware[i].  Today, Roth IRA investments account for approximately $660 billion, or just 8.4% of the total IRA investments on record[ii].  Many wonder why the Roth IRA, with all its tax benefits, has not been more popular among investors.

What is a Roth IRA?

A Roth IRA is a type of retirement account for individuals.  Most are familiar with the traditional IRA in which the original contributions are generally tax deductible and the account benefits from tax-deferred growth until withdrawals are taken.  A Roth IRA operates opposite, but with the same end-goal of saving for retirement.  Roth IRA contributions are not tax deductible in the year made.  However, the after-tax dollars contributed to the Roth IRA benefit from tax-free growth, meaning both the original proceeds contributed plus all the accumulated growth during the years of investment can be withdrawn tax-free in retirement.  Depending on the life and gain on the investment, this tax-free benefit could be huge.

Who should open a Roth IRA?

Although each scenario should be independently analyzed, typically Roth IRAs are beneficial investments for:

1.      Young Investors – Youth is an advantage in this scenario because a 40-year-old investor could have 25+ working years and annual contribution opportunities during which their investment may grow.  Approximately 31% of current Roth IRA owners are under age 40[iii].

2.      Households Subject to a High-Income in Retirement – Although the future tax code is undeterminable, if a household expects a combination of retirement income (i.e.: pension income, social security income, dividends and interest, Required Minimum Distribution proceeds) that is equivalent to or greater than their working income, utilization of a Roth IRA may be a desirable strategy to control taxable income in retirement.  That is because Roth IRA withdrawals are generally tax-free, meaning you can take as much as you need, whenever you need, without worrying about taxation.  Unbeknownst to many, high income in retirement can result in a great deal of complexities such as increased taxes on Social Security benefits, higher Medicare premiums, a higher overall tax bracket and IRS required quarterly estimated tax payments. 

3.      Estate Planning – Roth IRAs are excellent estate planning tools.  Roth IRAs are not subject to Required Minimum Distributions, and therefore, can be left alone to grow tax-free.  Then, they can be passed tax-free to children or grandchildren through an Inherited Roth IRA account, extending the tax-free growth for another generation.

Additional Roth IRA Benefits[iv]

  • No Age Limit – After age 70½, the IRS does not allow individuals to contribute to their IRAs.  However, Roth IRAs are not subject to the age rule and contributions can continue as long as the person has eligible working income
  • Roth’s Utilized Alongside Work Sponsored Plans – An investor can participate in their company’s work sponsored plan, such as a 401K, and still contribute to a Roth IRA concurrently.
  • Easy Withdrawals – Generally speaking, as long as the Roth contribution has been invested for 5 years+, the account holder can withdraw gains from the account tax-free and penalty free. The basis, or original investment amount, is not subject to the 5-year rule, and may be withdrawn at any time.  

Roth IRA Contributions and Conversions

Annually, an investor can contribute a maximum of $5,500 per year to a Roth IRA, plus another $1,000 per year catch-up contribution after turning age 50.  Between January 1, 2018 and April 15, 2018, you may be able to make Roth IRA contributions for both 2017 and 2018. If you are getting your taxes prepared, ask your CPA.  

Keep in mind that Roth IRA contributions and conversions are different animals.  A Roth IRA conversion is the transfer of money from a pre-tax IRA account, to an after-tax Roth IRA account.  As the titles might suggest, the conversion is a taxable event and the transfer amount is considered earned income by the IRS.  Therefore, before making the conversion, check with your CPA how much a conversion of say $5,000, $10,000 or $15,000 might create in tax liability and only transfer what you are comfortable with.  Unlike Roth IRA contributions, conversions need to be completed before December 31st to count for that taxable year.

Due to the low Roth IRA annual contribution limits and phase out limits (if your Adjusted Gross Income is too high), many people are not able to make substantial investments directly into the Roth IRA.  Therefore, to take advantage of the Roth IRA tax benefits, investors may want to consider a Roth IRA conversion.  Consult with your CPA, attorney or Financial Advisor to ensure you are taking full advantage of opportunities.  

 

This commentary on this website reflects the personal opinions, viewpoints and analyses of the Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  employees providing such comments, and should not be regarded as a description of advisory services provided by Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  or performance returns of any Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  Investments client. The views reflected in the commentary are subject to change at any time without notice. Nothing on this website constitutes investment advice, performance data or any recommendation that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. Any mention of a particular security and related performance data is not a recommendation to buy or sell that security. Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc. manages its clients’ accounts using a variety of investment techniques and strategies, which are not necessarily discussed in the commentary. Investments in securities involve the risk of loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.


[i] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roth_IRA

[ii] https://www.ici.org/pdf/ten_facts_roth_iras.pdf

[iii] https://www.ici.org/pdf/ten_facts_roth_iras.pdf

[iv] Financial Planning: Why aren’t more clients using Roth IRAs?

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The Past, the Present, and Your Long-Term Goals

The past year, 2017, was by any measure, an amazing year. The U.S. and international markets ignored North Korean missile threats, Presidential fire and fury, hurricane devastation, a ballooning national deficit, and yet produced the following broad market gains:

* The Wilshire 5000 Total Market Index -- the broadest measure of U.S. stocks -- finished the year up 20.99%.¹

* The Standard and Poors 500 Index of large company stocks returned 19.42% by the end of 2017.²

* The Russell Midcap Index finished 2017 up 18.52%.³

* The Russell 2000 Small-Cap Index gained 14.65% for the year.³

* The technology-based Nasdaq Composite Index rose 28.24% for the year.⁴

* In international stocks, the broad-based EAFE Index of developed foreign economies ended the year up 21.78%.⁵

* Emerging market stocks of less developed foreign countries, represented by the EAFE EM Index, posted a 34.35% gain for the year.⁵

* In the bond market, the coupon rate on 10-year U.S. Treasury bonds rose 2.41%.⁶

* Thirty-year municipal bonds yielded 2.62%.⁷

Last year's market performance caps a span of time from 2009 up to the present in which there have been no significant downturns, and returns have been generally upward. The questions on many people's minds are "How long can this last?" and "When should I get out?" Many investors who tried to time the market concluded over a year ago that the party was over, and cashed out their holdings. Then, they watched on the sidelines as the Dow Jones Industrial Average captured record high after record high. It's a demonstration of how difficult it is to predict market performance. 

Timing the market is made even more difficult by the fact that you have to be right twice -- when to get out, and when to get back in. The result for most people is missing out on periods of exceptional returns, taking a hit to the value of their portfolios, and suffering a setback on achieving their most important life goals.

The penalty for mistiming the market is high. For example, investors who stayed in large cap stocks for all 5,218 trading days between the beginning of 1997 and the end of 2016, achieved a compound annual return of 7.7%. If they missed only the 10 best days of stock returns in 19 years, they would have received only 4.0%. If they missed the 50 best days, they would have lost 4.2% per year.⁸

Trying to avoid bear markets (markets when stock values go down) is not that productive for long-term investors because bear markets tend to be short, and eventually come to an end. Bear markets have lasted on average less than two years since 1970. As long as you didn't panic, even the terrible Great Recession of 2008 and 2009 was not a disaster. You would have recovered in four years.⁹ By comparison, many people spend 25 to 30 years in retirement.

A broad, globally-diversified portfolio that balances all the asset classes is effective at tempering market fluctuations, and is well-suited to achieving long-term goals. Rather than stewing over when to get out of the market, your time and energy may be better spent maintaining a long-term outlook for your investment strategies, and working with your advisor to develop a comprehensive financial plan that is aligned with your life goals.

¹ www.wilshire.com/Indexes/calculator/

² www.standardandpoors.com/indices/sp-500/en/us

³ www.ftse.com/products/indices/russell-us

⁴ www.nasdaq.com/markets/indices/nasdaq-total-returns.aspx

⁵ www.msci.com/end-of-day-data-search

⁶ www.bloomberg.com/markets/rates-bonds/government-bonds/us/

⁷ www.bloomberg.com/markets/rates-bonds/corporate-bonds/

⁸ Loring Ward, 360 Insights, winter 2018

⁹ Associated Press, March 5, 2013

 

This commentary on this website reflects the personal opinions, viewpoints and analyses of the Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  employees providing such comments, and should not be regarded as a description of advisory services provided by Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  or performance returns of any Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  Investments client. The views reflected in the commentary are subject to change at any time without notice. Nothing on this website constitutes investment advice, performance data or any recommendation that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. Any mention of a particular security and related performance data is not a recommendation to buy or sell that security. Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc. manages its clients’ accounts using a variety of investment techniques and strategies, which are not necessarily discussed in the commentary. Investments in securities involve the risk of loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

 

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Tax Reform Highlights

On December 22, President Trump signed into law H.R.1, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.  People are calling the new law the most significant tax reform in 31 years since the Tax Reform Act of 1976 passed by President Gerald Ford.  The difficulty is the original law was passed in the House with tweaks, then passed in the Senate, with more tweaks.  Then the House and Senate versions of the law needed to be reconciled into H.R.1, which also underwent eleventh hour changes before its final presentation on the 22nd, just in time for Christmas.  Not surprisingly, many have not had the chance to read the full 500-odd page brand new law and so the details are sparse and whatever we thought we did know might not have made it into the final version of the passed law.  Here are some highlights of what we do know:

How will tax reform impact individual taxpayers?[i]

The impact of the bill from 2018 through 2025 on individual taxpayers include: 

1.      The top individual tax rate is reduced from 39.6% to 37%;

2.      In 2017, the standard deduction for a single taxpayer was $6,350, plus one personal exemption of $4,050.  Under the new tax code, those deductions are combined into one larger standard deduction for 2018: $12,200 for single filers and $24,400 for joint filers[ii];

3.      Personal exemptions are no longer deductible;

4.      The individual Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT), which is meant to prevent high income earners from paying too little in taxes, has now been eased with a higher exemption amount and increased phase-out levels;

5.      The mortgage interest deduction limit is reduced to $750,000 on new mortgages (previously, no limit) and home equity loan interest (HELOC) is no longer deductible;

6.      Individuals are capped at deducting up to $10,000 in total state and local taxes, which include income or sales tax plus property taxes (previously, no limit);

7.      The child tax credit is increased from $1,000 to $2,000; 

8.      Medical expenses in excess of 7.5% of Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) are deductible in 2017 and 2018, and then in excess of 10% of AGI thereafter;

9.      Moving expenses are no longer deductible;

10.  Alimony payments are no longer taxable or deductible starting in 2019;

11.  Miscellaneous itemized deductions are no longer allowed;

Did Estate Taxes Go Away?

Eliminating the estate tax was high up on the Republican tax agenda and was part of the original Republican Blueprint and the House version of the Tax Reform presented back in November.  However, the final version of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act does not eliminate the estate tax.  Rather, the tax exemption amount is doubled from $5.6 million to $11.2 million per person for 2018 through 2025.  In other words, a married couple can pass up to $22.4 million of assets to their children upon their death, estate tax free.  

How Does the Tax Reform Affect Small Businesses?

Small Businesses were one of the major parties affected by the Tax Reform.  Changes to the individual taxes are temporary and expire after 2025, but the tax code changes to businesses are permanent.  

Pass-through entities are companies such as S-Corporations or LLCs where the profits of the business flow through to the owner’s personal tax return.  These entities are taxed at the owners’ individual tax rate, which was as high as 39.6% before the Tax Reform.  Under the new legislation, pass-through entities could receive a deduction to their Qualified Business Income (QBI) as high as 20%, subject to limits, restrictions and phase-out[iii].  

C-Corporations are entities with their own tax rate and tax filing.  Shareholders pay taxes at their individual tax rates for dividends or distributions from the company, which created the double taxation adage.  Under the new Tax Reform, Corporations will have a flat tax rate of 21%.  Prior Corporations were subject to a tiered tax table that ranged from 15% to 35%[iv].

Long story short, while the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act was meant to simplify tax filings and remove loopholes, filing taxes for businesses just got more complicated.  If you think you may be affected, reach out to your CPA or attorney to get ask for their advice as to how you can benefit from the new tax code.  

How will this affect me?

For high tax states like California, the cap on your ability to deduct state and local taxes and property tax could reduce your eligible itemized deductions and therefore increase your taxes.  You should consult your CPA to determine if you are affected.  

The National Association of Realtors argues, anytime you make home ownership less appealing, home owners suffer through reduced or stagnant home values.  The new Tax Act puts a cap on the amount of mortgage interest that can be deducted in your tax return and no longer allows home equity loan interest to be deducted.  Only time will tell how much these changes truly affect the personal real estate market.  

Other analysts have said the newly passed tax reform will greatly benefit corporations and stock holders which in turn benefits the stock market and ultimately mass America – Trickle Down economics theory.  Since the passage of the Tax Reform act in the House, we have seen the stock market react positively to the reduced taxation and therefore higher corporate profitability anticipated in the years to come.  

Our hope is that the truly neediest Americans are able to benefit from Corporate Tax cuts.  The changes discussed will affect your 2018 tax year which you will file in 2019.  However, businesses considering a corporate structure change need to act by March 15th to have that change apply for the 2018 tax year.  Consult with your CPA, attorney or Financial Advisor to ensure you are taking full advantage of opportunities.  

This commentary on this website reflects the personal opinions, viewpoints and analyses of the Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  employees providing such comments, and should not be regarded as a description of advisory services provided by Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  or performance returns of any Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  Investments client. The views reflected in the commentary are subject to change at any time without notice. Nothing on this website constitutes investment advice, performance data or any recommendation that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. Any mention of a particular security and related performance data is not a recommendation to buy or sell that security. Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc. manages its clients’ accounts using a variety of investment techniques and strategies, which are not necessarily discussed in the commentary. Investments in securities involve the risk of loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.



[i]https://www.aicpa.org/taxreform?utm_source=Tax_SpecialAlert_A17DC902&utm_medium=email&utm_content=tax13&utm_campaign=TaxDec17&tab-1=2

[ii] http://www.businessinsider.com/tax-brackets-2018-trump-tax-plan-chart-house-senate-comparison-2017-11

[iii] https://www.forbes.com/sites/kellyphillipserb/2017/12/22/what-tax-reform-means-for-small-businesses-pass-through-entities/#5a83e26f6de3

[iv] https://www.fool.com/taxes/2018/01/03/heres-who-got-the-biggest-tax-rate-break-from-corp.aspx

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Balance

Balance is important in your portfolio, just like balance between work and play, office and family are important to your life and personal well-being.

Because we use a strategy for our clients based on broad, global diversification, regular rebalancing is especially important. Our portfolios typically contain many different "asset classes" --  U.S. large, medium, and small companies, international large, medium and small companies, emerging market holdings (such as China and India), real estate and bonds. There are often more than 6,000 different companies represented in a broadly, globally diversified investment. Diversification spreads your risk, and is just the opposite of "putting all your eggs in one basket." It tends to give you more consistent performance and good downside protection.

As you might expect, all these different asset classes don't all go up together -- they take turns, and each asset class usually has its day in the sun at different times. In a diversified strategy, rebalancing helps you to take advantage of the individual performance of each asset class.

You probably know that your investment portfolio is being rebalanced on a regular basis, but you might not know why.  Is it for higher returns?  For maintaining the agreed-upon balance of investments that is in your risk tolerance comfort zone?  Does rebalancing help manage portfolio risk?

The answer to the above is “yes,” “yes,” and “yes,” but with a qualification.  Rebalancing an investment portfolio is most importantly a form of discipline, a way to reduce the impact of those dangerous emotions of greed and panic in the investment process.

During a bull market, stock prices rise faster than bond values, causing them to make up a larger percentage of the portfolio than you signed on for.  Similarly, in a bear market, stocks will fall, while bonds often rise, causing your portfolio to become more conservative.  Real estate investments and commodities often rise or fall at different times than stocks or bonds, pulling your overall percentage allocations away from the target mix.

When you rebalance, you’re selling some assets that rose in price and buying the ones that went down. For us, if an asset class rises in value more than 2 to 5% in a 3-month period, depending on the asset class, we will usually sell some if it while it's up high, locking in some of the gains. Then, we use the proceeds from the sale to buy some of another asset class that looks like a bargain at the time. This discipline results, over time, in consistently buying low and selling high.

 

THREE WAYS TO REBALANCE  

1) The easiest is to use whatever new money is coming into the portfolio, monthly or quarterly, to buy the assets that have gone down, allowing you to make consistent adjustments that keep the portfolio at its recommended allocations.

2) Another possibility is to rebalance at certain times of the year—every three, six or twelve months.

3) Or you could follow a more sophisticated process, and rebalance whenever assets deviate by more than certain set percentages from the baseline asset allocation.

Using a simple mix of 60% stocks and 40% bonds shows that rebalancing using the percentage deviation method tends to lead to higher overall returns from the beginning of 2000 to January 2016.¹  Wider bands sometimes produce higher returns (and fewer rebalances), although of course there is no guarantee that this would be the case in the future.

Perhaps most importantly, rebalancing brings you back, over and over again, to the allocation that you established when you started your investment. If you are working with a Certified Financial Planner™ or CPA, this allocation was designed to give you the long-term returns that would best accomplish your most important goals in your comprehensive financial plan. 

When it comes to making decisions in a time of crisis, having a rebalancing policy in place ensures that buys and sells will be made with discipline, rather than emotion.

¹ 5/22/2017 Seeking Alpha

This commentary on this website reflects the personal opinions, viewpoints and analyses of the Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  employees providing such comments, and should not be regarded as a description of advisory services provided by Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  or performance returns of any Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  Investments client. The views reflected in the commentary are subject to change at any time without notice. Nothing on this website constitutes investment advice, performance data or any recommendation that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. Any mention of a particular security and related performance data is not a recommendation to buy or sell that security. Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc. manages its clients’ accounts using a variety of investment techniques and strategies, which are not necessarily discussed in the commentary. Investments in securities involve the risk of loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

 

 

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BITCOIN 101

It’s hard to turn on your TV or read the paper without some hype about becoming a millionaire off of Bitcoin investments.  Usually it ends with a scare tactic, call-to-action like, “If you don’t act now, you’ll be left behind!”  For many, the next couple of questions are, “What is Bitcoin?” and “How safe is it?”

Bitcoin is a “new” type of cryptocurrency - or more simply put, a form of digital money.  In 2009, Bitcoin was created by Satoshi Nakamoto as the first decentralized cryptocurrency.  All forms of prior digital currency were centralized, through an authority or middle man such as a banking institution.  Bitcoin’s decentralized model uses miners or record-keepers who transfer coin and record transactions in a public distribution ledger.

How Bitcoin works

Currency exchanges exist online, all over the world, where Bitcoin can be purchased in one’s native currency.  Your Bitcoin balance is digital and accessible online through any technology such as your home computer or phone.  Theoretically, you can use your Bitcoin to purchase anything, like you would with regular cash, but your Bitcoin is not subject to cash limitations such as dollar limit of purchase, currency exchange, international borders, transfer limits and fees, etc. It is touted by Bitcoin users that more everyday vendors such as restaurants and movie theatres are accepting Bitcoin payment around the world.   

Bitcoin in a nutshell

Bitcoin Advantages:

-          Payment is transferred person to person online, rather than through an institution, such as a bank.  The peer-to-peer structure theoretically removes fees that a bank would charge for facilitating the transfer, currency exchange, etc.

-          No pre-requisites or limits

-          Your account cannot be frozen

-          The upside potential for growth and acceptance of Bitcoin could yield a hefty return for the initial investors.

Bitcoin Disadvantages:

-          There is currently little to no regulatory oversight over the cryptocurrency industry, nor protections in place for the investors

-          The primary current uses of Bitcoin are rumored to relate to illegal drugs and illicit weaponry

-          The value of Bitcoin is arbitrary in an unregulated market.  Therefore, the risk of a bubble or sudden drop in value is high.

Bitcoin bubble?

Bitcoin excitement circulates around the unknown potential of the new currency.  Some Initial Coin Offerings (ICOs) have even hired celebrities like Floyd Mayweather and Paris Hilton to promote their projects and endorse virtual money – a move highly criticized by the Securities & Exchange Commission[i].  

Perhaps unfair, but some have compared the Bitcoin buzz to the likes of the Dutch Tulip Mania of the 17th Century or the Dotcom Bubble of 2000.  Bitcoin (BTC-USD) is trading near 12,700, up approximately 1,300% in 2017[ii], compared to the Dow Jones Industrial which was up a stingy 21%[iii] during the same period.  In 1999, tech stocks with negative earnings were going up in value, on what was coined as “the new norm” because net earnings were deemed less relevant than internet traffic and future potential.  The normal rules about prudent investing were thrown out the window.  In hindsight, the tech phase was not different, but a bubble that burst.  The Bitcoin craze is showing signs of the same rapid growth, but with no regulation at all.    

The consensus of many investment professionals is that buying Bitcoin now would be late in the game (buying high), and the highly speculative investment could end in financial hardship to the average person.  

Digital currency is still in its infancy.  The idea of a currency medium that transcends international boundaries and is tracked and exchanged online is transformative.  However, it is too early to know who the winners and losers will be in the cryptocurrency horse race.  Going back to the Dotcom timeframe, many of our current household names like Facebook and Twitter, didn’t even exist until after the crash.  However, they were birthed from the innovative foundations (and subsequent deaths) of trailblazers like Classmates.com, Friendster and MySpace.

Before you make a large financial decision about a speculative investment, consult your Financial Advisor to ensure you are investing in a manner that matches your risk tolerance and not compromising your overall retirement planning.  When you have a network of professionals working together to provide you sound recommendations, you are more likely to create a plan that provides you and your family peace of mind.  

 

This commentary on this website reflects the personal opinions, viewpoints and analyses of the Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  employees providing such comments, and should not be regarded as a description of advisory services provided by Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  or performance returns of any Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  Investments client. The views reflected in the commentary are subject to change at any time without notice. Nothing on this website constitutes investment advice, performance data or any recommendation that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. Any mention of a particular security and related performance data is not a recommendation to buy or sell that security. Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc. manages its clients’ accounts using a variety of investment techniques and strategies, which are not necessarily discussed in the commentary. Investments in securities involve the risk of loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.


[i] https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/01/business/sec-warns-celebrities-endorsing-virtual-money.html

[ii] https://finance.yahoo.com/chart/BTC-USD

[iii] https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/%5EDJI?p=^DJI

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EDUCATIONAL WORKSHOPS

2019 SCHEDULE 

YOUR 2019 INVESTMENT STRATEGY

Saturday, March 16, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

South Pasadena Public Library Community Room**

1115 El Centro St.

South Pasadena, CA  91030

**This activity is not sponsored by the City of South Pasadena or the South Pasadena Public Library

 

YOUR 2019 INVESTMENT STRATEGY

Saturday, March 23, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Ken Nakaoka Center*

1670 W. 162nd St.,

Gardena, CA  90247

*not sponsored by the City of Gardena

 

HELP YOUR CHILDREN WITH FINANCES

Saturday, May 4, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Ken Nakaoka Center*

1670 W. 162nd St.,

Gardena, CA  90247

*Not sponsored by the City of Gardena

 

HELP YOUR CHILDREN WITH FINANCES

Saturday, May 11, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

South Pasadena Public Library Community Room**

1115 El Centro St.,

South Pasadena, CA  91030

**This activity is not sponsored by the City of South Pasadena or the South Pasadena Public Library

 

YOUR RETIREMENT CHECKLIST AND LTC/LI HYBRIDS

Saturday, July 13, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Kondo Wealth Advisors Pasadena Office (tentative)

300 N. Lake Ave. Suite 920

Pasadena, CA  91101

 

YOUR RETIREMENT CHECKLIST AND LTC/LI HYBRIDS

Saturday, July 20, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Ken Nakaoka Center*

1670 W. 162nd St.,

Gardena, CA  90247

*not sponsored by the City of Gardena

 

INVESTING AFTER AGE 70.5 AND RMDs

Saturday, September 7, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

South Pasadena Public Library Community Room**

1115 El Centro St.

South Pasadena, CA  91030

**This activity is not sponsored by the City of South Pasadena or the South Pasadena Public Library

 

INVESTING AFTER AGE 70.5 AND RMDs

Saturday, September 14, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Ken Nakaoka Center*

1670 W. 162nd St.,

Gardena, CA  90247

*not sponsored by the City of Gardena

 

 

Contact Us

300 North Lake Avenue, Suite 920
Pasadena, California 91101
Phone: (626) 449-7783
Fax: (626) 449-7785
Email: info@kondowealthadvisors.com

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