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Easy Estate Planning Tips

In the juggle of daily life, many have a running list of To-Do’s that they steadily chip away at.  Some agenda items take priority, like grocery shopping or paying the bills, and inadvertently, some are pushed to the bottom of the totem pole to achieve “tomorrow.”  Unfortunately, estate planning is often in the latter category due to what we perceive as too complex or not urgent.  However, these are simple tips that can make estate planning effective and ensure that your kids, not the IRS are your biggest beneficiary after you pass away.    

Review your living will and trust regularly

Time flies by in the blink of an eye.  We recommend that you meet with your attorney at least every 5 years (max 10) to ensure that your trustees, executors, guardians, beneficiaries, and healthcare agents are all up-to-date.  Equally as important, you should ensure that your trust takes advantage of the most recent tax rules, which seem to be changing rapidly these days.  In the year 2000, the estate tax exclusion was $675,000[i].  Today, the estate tax exclusion is $5.49M[ii] per person, and under the Trump Tax Proposal, the gift tax exclusion may double to nearly $11M[iii] per person or nearly $22M per couple.  Meeting with your attorney regularly will ensure that your trust is taking advantage of the current tax code and structured to pass assets to your beneficiaries in the most efficient manner.  

A revocable trust provides privacy over a will

Sometimes people feel that their finances are too simple to require a trust and their wishes can be captured in a will alone.  What many don’t realize is a will does not protect your privacy.  When you pass away, your estate transfer is a public record that anybody can have access to.  That can lead creditors to tie up your estate in probate if they claim rights to your assets.  On the other hand, a revocable trust will provide you privacy and pass assets to your heirs upon your passing, escaping probate. 

Fund your trust

Often people go through all the steps to create a thorough and well thought-out trust but then fail to actually retitle assets into the trust name.  Consult with your attorney regarding which assets should be transferred into the trust title for protection if you pass away.

Provide titling consistency

Review the beneficiary designations on accounts such as retirement accounts, life insurance policies and annuities.  Your beneficiary designation will take precedence over your will or trust if there is a discrepancy.  For example, if the beneficiary of your life insurance policy is your ex-spouse, proceeds will go to that person, no matter what the will or trust dictates.  

Pre-tax or qualified assets such as IRAs typically have individuals listed as beneficiaries instead of your trust.  That is because IRA assets afford better tax benefits to the beneficiaries if they are inherited directly, rather than being inherited through the trust.  For example, if a parent lists a child as the primary beneficiary of their IRA, when he/she passes away, the child can receive the money in an Inherited IRA and continue to benefit from the same tax deferral treatment.  If the trust is the primary beneficiary instead, the IRS can take income taxes from the account which has grown tax deferred all these years and only the net proceeds may be disseminated per the trust language.  

Utilize the annual gift tax exemption

Under the current tax code, you can gift up to $14,000 per year, per person, gift-tax free.  For a couple, that means you could gift a total of $28,000 to each person annually without triggering gift taxes.  For a family of four, that could amount to a total gift of $112,000, tax free, every year!  This annual gifting strategy does not tap into your lifetime gift tax exemption (currently $5.49M per person).  

Future tax law changes

Tax laws are currently in limbo and could change within the next year.  However, delaying your estate planning for future tax changes could leave you or your loved ones in financial disarray if no planning is completed and something unexpected happens.  Even if the estate tax exemption is repealed in full, there’s no telling if the next administration will put estate taxes back in effect.  When drafting a living will and trust, you can draft a durable power of attorney over health and finances to designate someone to act on your behalf if you become incapacitated.  In addition to wills and trusts, there are many estate planning tools available that provide protection of assets against lawsuits and claims.  

What’s next?

If you don’t have a will and trust in place, ask an attorney if creating one would be appropriate for you.  If you have a will or trust already, look at the last time it was updated and make an appointment with your estate planning attorney if it’s time to revisit the good planning you’ve already done.  Often, you can update your trust with an amendment rather than recreating the entire trust from scratch.  

Once the new tax laws are finalized, consult with your attorney, CPA and Financial Advisor to ensure you are taking full advantage of opportunities available.  When you have a network of professionals working together to provide you sound recommendations, you will create an estate plan that provides you and your family peace of mind. 

This commentary on this website reflects the personal opinions, viewpoints and analyses of the Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  employees providing such comments, and should not be regarded as a description of advisory services provided by Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  or performance returns of any Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  Investments client. The views reflected in the commentary are subject to change at any time without notice. Nothing on this website constitutes investment advice, performance data or any recommendation that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. Any mention of a particular security and related performance data is not a recommendation to buy or sell that security. Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc. manages its clients’ accounts using a variety of investment techniques and strategies, which are not necessarily discussed in the commentary. Investments in securities involve the risk of loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.



[i] https://www.thebalance.com/exemption-from-federal-estate-taxes-3505630

[ii] https://www.thebalance.com/exemption-from-federal-estate-taxes-3505630

[iii] https://www.cnbc.com/2017/11/03/the-good-the-bad-and-the-money-what-the-gop-tax-plan-means-for-you.html

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Giving Thanks

How did we get to the end of the year so quickly? Now that they start playing Christmas music after Halloween, the years seem to fly by more quickly than ever.

This has been an eventful year for the market, which has built on gains that have totaled 359%¹  since the beginning of the rally in March 2009. Our clients have been happy with the performance, but also a little nervous. They are aware that every eight to ten years on average, the U.S. market goes through a correction or downturn in the market. It's actually healthy for the market to find its correct price, cool down, and eventually go on to hit new highs.

We believe the expected correction will be a relatively mild one, because the underlying U.S. economy is very strong, much stronger than most global economies. On that basis, many economists feel that the market should do well for at least the next couple of years, even if we have a correction.

Investors who have a broad, globally-diversified portfolio should do well. Diversification means spreading your risk as widely as possible, just the opposite of putting all your eggs in one basket. This approach helps alleviate a correction because different assets behave differently, often just the opposite of one another. When the U.S. market goes through a rough patch, the international market tends to do quite well, and pick up the slack. It's fortuitous that currently, the international market is already doing very well, hitting record highs.

Thanksgiving is also the time of year that we send out Required Minimum Distributions on retirement accounts (like an IRA, 401k, 403b, etc.) for our clients who are age 70 ½ or older. This is mandatory, and the penalties for non-compliance are harsh -- if you don't take your RMD like you're supposed to, the IRS can penalize you 50% on what you should have taken out. If your financial advisor is on top of things, he or she should have already calculated your RMD for this year, and let you know that it will be sent to you before the end of the year. If you haven't already received this notice, you may want to be proactive and make sure that your RMD is in the works.

Your Required Minimum Distribution is re-calculated every year. Your financial advisor will take the value of your retirement account on December 31, 2016, and divide it by a factor based on your age. At age 70 ½, your RMD is about 4%. The percentage gradually increases as you get older. Many people think that the value of their retirement account will decrease once they start taking RMDs, but this doesn't have to be the case. It's not unreasonable for a retirement account to grow 7% per year or more on the average in a highly-diversified strategy. Even if you have to take a 4% RMD, your account can still grow. This can give you the peace of mind that you're not going to run out of money in retirement.

The end of the year is a good time to harvest losses in your investment. Tax loss harvesting is the practice of selling a security that has experienced a loss. You are able to offset taxes on both gains and income. If you have a passive gain (e.g., from selling an investment or real estate), you can wipe out or reduce the taxes by harvesting a similar loss. If you have no passive gains, you can reduce up to $3,000 per year of ordinary income with a long-term passive loss.

If you have carry-over passive losses from previous years, you can take advantage of those losses by selling some investments at a gain. Your Certified Financial Planner™ and CPA can collaborate to match gains and losses. This way, you can sell some investments on which you would normally pay capital gains taxes, and pay no taxes at all!

Finally, this is a good time of year to consider supporting your favorite community organization, church or temple with a charitable contribution. If you donate appreciated investments, you can escape paying capital gains taxes, and the charitable organization (because it pays no income or capital gains taxes) will receive the full amount. It's a win-win. 

If you haven't decided which organizations you want to benefit, but want to take the tax deduction this year, think about opening a Donor Advised Fund. You'll be able to take an immediate tax deduction, and decide later on who you want to gift to. Because you can keep the money invested and growing in a Donor Advised Fund, it's the type of gift that can keep on giving.

You can donate your Required Minimum Distribution as well. One of the most effective ways to do this is through a Qualified Charitable Distribution. The QCD is written directly from the investment to the organization. This way, your Required Minimum Distribution bypasses the calculation for Adjusted Gross Income, and helps to keep down the taxation of your Social Security benefits, and your Medicare premium.

Consult with your Certified Financial Planner™ or CPA to determine what type of contribution would benefit you the most.

We hope you have a happy and healthy holiday season!

¹ WSJ 11/18/2017, based on the performance of the Standard & Poors 500 index

This commentary on this website reflects the personal opinions, viewpoints and analyses of the Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  employees providing such comments, and should not be regarded as a description of advisory services provided by Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  or performance returns of any Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  Investments client. The views reflected in the commentary are subject to change at any time without notice. Nothing on this website constitutes investment advice, performance data or any recommendation that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. Any mention of a particular security and related performance data is not a recommendation to buy or sell that security. Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc. manages its clients’ accounts using a variety of investment techniques and strategies, which are not necessarily discussed in the commentary. Investments in securities involve the risk of loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

 

 

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Behavioral Finance Takes Nobel Prize for Economics

This month, University of Chicago economist Richard Thaler was awarded the 2017 Nobel Prize in Economics by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. This was a controversial decision, for a number of reasons. 

Thaler is a proponent of behavioral finance, which is the study of economics and finance from a psychological perspective. Up until recently, mainstream economic theory was based on the assumption that people behave rationally. Professor Thaler's theories, on the other hand, pioneered the view that people, especially when it comes to personal finance, often behave in ways that contradict traditional economic rules and reason. 

The traditional economic approach was to view human financial choices like particles in physics. The outcome could be predicted by a few established rules. All of us—and especially professional financial planners—know that these assumptions are far from what we have observed in the real world. After receiving the award, Professor Thaler commented, "In order to do good economics, you have to keep in mind that people are human." 

Thaler spent his entire career exploring the differences between these unrealistically idealized economic assumptions and actual human behavior.  He demonstrated that people take mental short-cuts—called “heuristics”—when they make what they believe to be logical decisions.  He showed that in the real world, human decisions are often impulsive, and self-control is more often an aspiration than a reality. Although investment selection and globally-diversified asset allocation are important investing tools, it is often behavior that ultimately determines whether a portfolio will help an investor achieve fulfillment and satisfaction in life.

Thaler also developed a theory of “mental accounting,” which explained how people make financial decisions by creating separate accounts in their minds—one for college funding, say, and another for retirement, and still another for vacations or a new car.  He explored those mental short-cuts and found that people tend to expect more in the future of what they’ve recently experienced (short-term bias), and often believe they have more knowledge about their decisions than they actually do. 

Although his views have been regarded by radical by some traditionalists, they have already had broad impact in the real world. In his 2008 book, "Nudge," Thaler and his co-author Cass Sunstein discussed ways to help people make better financial decisions, and argued for public policy changes that would help average people by "nudging" their behavior in a positive direction. For example, there was a pervasive problem that most people were not saving enough for retirement. It was difficult for many people to control their impulses. If they had money in their hands, the tendency was to spend it, rather than put it away for the future.

Thaler suggested "opt-out" retirement savings plans. Previously, employees had to take individual action to enroll in their company's 401(k) retirement plan. Even though the money they contributed to the 401(k) would grow tax-deferred, would reduce their taxable income, and in many cases would be supplemented by an employer's matching contribution, many employees failed to enroll. Thaler's studies sparked a sweeping shift towards automatic enrollment into employer-sponsored retirement plans. In other words, participation is now the default option, and you have to take individual action if you choose not to enroll. This shifted inertia to the side of the preferred decision.

Thaler's thinking is especially relevant today. In a perfectly rational world, all-knowing investors and consumers would never have market bubbles or market crashes, since every market price is right and fair at any particular moment. We have had 8 years of fairly-sustained growth in the market, but we know that every 8 to 10 years on the average, we have a market correction of 10% or more. This is normal and healthy for the market, and is a way for stocks to find their true value. If we were perfectly rational people, we would recognize that the market has always recovered from these corrections, and will likely proceed to hit new highs. However, the emotional, irrational side of us could take over, and cause us to sell all our holdings at the bottom on the market. Not only would we be locking in the losses, but losing the long-term growth could prevent us from accomplishing important, long-term goals. As financial advisors, we do our most important and valuable work when markets are down, guiding our clients through those difficult periods and helping them manage their behavior.

Thaler’s prize suggests that the world of economics is starting to catch on to the messy decision-making that actually goes on in the real world.

 

Sources:

* Washington Post, 10/9/2017

* The Guardian, 10/11/2017

* New York Times, 10/9/2017

* The Economist, 10/23/2017

 

This commentary on this website reflects the personal opinions, viewpoints and analyses of the Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  employees providing such comments, and should not be regarded as a description of advisory services provided by Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  or performance returns of any Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  Investments client. The views reflected in the commentary are subject to change at any time without notice. Nothing on this website constitutes investment advice, performance data or any recommendation that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. Any mention of a particular security and related performance data is not a recommendation to buy or sell that security. Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc. manages its clients’ accounts using a variety of investment techniques and strategies, which are not necessarily discussed in the commentary. Investments in securities involve the risk of loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

 

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ADJUST YOUR ASSET ALLOCATION FOR CHANGING TIMES

These days, it's difficult for me to watch the news without a feeling of dread.  The Breaking News is a stream of political turmoil, division, violence and geopolitical stress.  If it's not a mass shooting next door, it's a prediction for World War III around the corner.  It makes for exciting evening news headlines, but I would prefer calm, reason and compassion.  

When something unexpected happens, it’s important to understand the facts and risks without panicking.  In the short term, political disorder may result in temporary market disruption, or a fluctuation in the stock market.  For younger investors who have a long investment window, stock market turmoil isn’t as concerning because they have time on their side and can ride out the temporary ups and downs.  However, retired investors who have less time to recover from market volatility, and rely on their investment portfolio for steady income, may want to consider making a conservative adjustment to their investment portfolio.  

Analyzing Your Asset Allocation

As we know, financial markets can be unpredictable, no matter how much we might hope for comfortable stability.  Although good times can make us exuberant and tough times can make our stomachs churn, reacting to market ups and downs isn’t useful.  There are few guarantees in life, but taking sensible precautions and staying focused on your important long-term goals can make a real difference as change inevitably comes.

A practical starting point is reviewing your asset allocation to ensure it is still appropriate for your life circumstances.  Typically, investors start with an asset allocation that is appropriate for them with a balance of US equities and International equities for growth, and fixed income or bonds for downside protection when the market experiences a decline.  A well-constructed asset allocation can reduce the volatility of your portfolio, and serve you well over reasonable fluctuations in the market.  

However, when significant life events occur, such as retirement, it is important to review and revise your asset allocation to reflect the change in your goals.  During your working years, your investment goal may have focused primarily on growth.  In retirement, the goal of preservation may take priority instead.  

Understanding Fixed Income

Fixed income or bonds are often a significant portion of an investor’s portfolio.  Commonly investors will say, “That bond fund hasn’t been doing well – maybe it’s time to sell it!”  However, fixed income is never added to a portfolio with the intent that it will be the best performing fund in the batch.  Rather, fixed income is in your portfolio to give you downside protection if the stock market goes south.  When uncertainty arises, the value of fixed income tends to increase and counteracts the loss on the equity side of your portfolio.  Fixed income is meant for protection.  

In years past when interest rates were at moderate levels, we often suggested individual tax-free municipal bonds, or corporate bonds for our clients.  Individually-held tax-free municipal bonds, or corporate bonds are great fixed income products that provide stable interest income to investors and return of principal at maturity.  However, we are now in a period of record low interest rates and buying moderate or long-term bonds today essentially means you are locking in yesterday’s low rates.  The Federal Reserve has increased interest rates twice this year and four times since 2015[i].  In other words, if you bought a 10-year Treasury at 2% at the beginning of the year, the same investment would be paying a higher return of 2.5% today.  Consequently, if you had to redeem your 2% bond prior to maturity, you would probably have to sell it at a loss. 

In a rising interest rate environment, like we are currently experiencing, short-term fixed income mutual funds work well.  Short-term is considered anything with a maturity of 5 years or less.  In this "basket" of many individual bonds, there are bonds maturing every week.  As they mature, they are replaced with new bonds at the (probably higher) market interest rate.  This allows your fixed income fund to keep up with rising interest rates and still provide you downside protection if the equity market dips.

When interest rates go back up to normal levels, you can reposition from fixed income mutual funds into individual bonds. The advantage of an individual bond is that it can lock in high interest, and as long as you hold onto it until it matures, the return of principal can be guaranteed. 

Ask for a Second Opinion

As you get older or transition into retirement, you may want to reduce volatility in your portfolio and take a more conservative stance.  Act proactively, and have your financial advisor review your asset allocation (the balance of the different elements that make up your investment).  He or she may recommend that you increase your fixed income holdings now while the market is at a high.  Making changes to your investment portfolio as your life changes is natural and prudent, and is the opposite of market timing.   

It may feel like today’s news headlines are more alarming than ever.  However, keep in mind that over the history of the stock market, the Dow Jones Industrial Average has recovered from what nay-sayers have called the end-of-investing…. many times.  From the Great Depression, to Black Monday of 1987 to the Dot-com Bubble and through the Great Recession in 2008 and 2009, the market has shown resilience and strength.  If you feel it’s time, ask your Certified Financial Planner™ for a check-up, and for candid answers to your concerns.  If you don’t have a financial sounding board already, many financial planners will offer you a free initial consultation where you can ask questions and get timely feedback, no (financial) strings attached.  

 

This commentary on this website reflects the personal opinions, viewpoints and analyses of the Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  employees providing such comments, and should not be regarded as a description of advisory services provided by Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  or performance returns of any Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  Investments client. The views reflected in the commentary are subject to change at any time without notice. Nothing on this website constitutes investment advice, performance data or any recommendation that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. Any mention of a particular security and related performance data is not a recommendation to buy or sell that security. Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc. manages its clients’ accounts using a variety of investment techniques and strategies, which are not necessarily discussed in the commentary. Investments in securities involve the risk of loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

 


[i] http://www.npr.org

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Dissecting Turmp's Tax Reform

On Wednesday September 27th, President Trump and Republican leaders in Congress unveiled a new tax plan that, if passed in its current form, could create dramatic changes to the current tax code.  

Highlights of the new tax reform include[i]:

  • Compression from the current 7 income tax brackets (ranging from 10% to 39.6%) to 3 brackets: 12%, 25% and 35%.  Congress can add a fourth bracket above 35%.

  • Doubling the standard deduction from $6,350 to $12,000 for individuals, and from $12,700 to $24,000 for married couples

  • Boosting the child tax credit from $1,000 to an unspecified higher amount

  • A new $500 credit for caring for elderly relatives

  • Reducing the corporate tax rate from 35% to 20%

  • A lower top tax rate for small businesses at 25%

  • Taxpayers in high tax states such as California and New York could lose the ability to deduct state and local income taxes and property taxes on their federal return 

  • Elimination of the corporate and individual Alternative Minimum Tax

  • Elimination of estate taxes on large inheritances

  • Elimination of many other (currently) non-specified tax deductions

How will this affect me?

President Trump declared his proposal will “protect low-income and middle-income households, not the wealthy and well-connected.”  However, Democrats are already opposed to the tax reform, calling it a tax break for the wealthy.  

On the surface, it appears that the lowest tax bracket is increasing from 10% to 12% and the highest tax bracket is lowering from 39.6% to 35%.  However, the specific income levels tied to each of the new tax brackets is yet to be revealed, so it’s not certain where everyone will fall or how they’ll be affected.  Republicans say those who are paying 10% now might not be subject to taxation at all under the new plan, so they are going down to 0%, not pushed up to 12%.  

The National Association of Realtors argues that having a higher standard deduction could make home ownership less valuable in comparison to renting.  Further, it could decrease the value of existing homes.  This is because as the standard deduction rises, people are more likely to take the standard deduction and less likely to itemize their taxes.  Mortgage interest expenses and property taxes can only be deducted if a person itemizes their taxes.  

Other analysts have said that the proposed tax reform will greatly benefit corporations and stock holders.  Although the details aren’t clear yet, the plan proposes a shift from a worldwide tax system to a new territorial system.  International companies based in the U.S. would not be taxed on income earned overseas.  This would allow companies to bring back the profits earned overseas without incurring additional taxes.  To discourage companies from shifting all profits to countries with low tax rates, the plan also includes an unspecified minimum foreign tax.  The goal is to make US companies more competitive internationally and for foreign profits to reinvest back into the US market, furthering the economy and job growth.  

Analysts believe that other tax deductions and credits must be eliminated to make up for the tax cuts proposed in the reform.  However, exactly which deductions will be eliminated is yet to be seen.  Some worry that public programs and benefits for the countries neediest will be eliminated.  The elderly are particularly worried about the benefits under Social Security and Medicare; programs and benefits they depend on to make ends meet.  

Experts predict that the current tax reform proposal could reduce government revenue by more than $2 trillion dollars[ii] over the next decade.  This will add to the current $20 trillion dollars of debt carried by the US currently.  

What’s next?

President Trump’s goal is to implement the new tax code by the end of 2018, but it’s unknown what revisions will be made to gain more support for passage.  Next week the Senate is to begin deliberating the new tax bill.  Currently the Republicans dominate both the House and the Senate.  Some guess that the President has left areas for negotiation that will help to gain greater support from Democrats – such as the possible fourth tax bracket.  

Truly, nothing is certain at this point and each proposal is a bargaining chip for the Republican and Democratic parties until the reform is passed.  However, the economic market and stock market are never predictable.  This further reiterates the need for an investment strategy that is highly diversified and balanced.  Rather than trying to predict where the market will go, investors should have a predetermined exposure to each asset class and capture gains wherever they arise.  

Once the new tax laws go into effect, consult with your CPA or Financial Advisor to ensure you are taking full advantage of opportunities.  Hopefully the new tax system will benefit all Americans. 

This commentary on this website reflects the personal opinions, viewpoints and analyses of the Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  employees providing such comments, and should not be regarded as a description of advisory services provided by Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  or performance returns of any Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  Investments client. The views reflected in the commentary are subject to change at any time without notice. Nothing on this website constitutes investment advice, performance data or any recommendation that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. Any mention of a particular security and related performance data is not a recommendation to buy or sell that security. Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc. manages its clients’ accounts using a variety of investment techniques and strategies, which are not necessarily discussed in the commentary. Investments in securities involve the risk of loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.


[i] https://www.cbsnews.com/live-news/trump-tax-plan-remarks-live-updates/

[ii] https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/27/us/politics/trump-tax-cut-plan-middle-class-deficit.html?mcubz=1

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EDUCATIONAL WORKSHOPS

2019 SCHEDULE 

YOUR 2019 INVESTMENT STRATEGY

Saturday, March 16, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

South Pasadena Public Library Community Room**

1115 El Centro St.

South Pasadena, CA  91030

**This activity is not sponsored by the City of South Pasadena or the South Pasadena Public Library

 

YOUR 2019 INVESTMENT STRATEGY

Saturday, March 23, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Ken Nakaoka Center*

1670 W. 162nd St.,

Gardena, CA  90247

*not sponsored by the City of Gardena

 

HELP YOUR CHILDREN WITH FINANCES

Saturday, May 4, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Ken Nakaoka Center*

1670 W. 162nd St.,

Gardena, CA  90247

*Not sponsored by the City of Gardena

 

HELP YOUR CHILDREN WITH FINANCES

Saturday, May 11, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

South Pasadena Public Library Community Room**

1115 El Centro St.,

South Pasadena, CA  91030

**This activity is not sponsored by the City of South Pasadena or the South Pasadena Public Library

 

YOUR RETIREMENT CHECKLIST AND LTC/LI HYBRIDS

Saturday, July 13, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Kondo Wealth Advisors Pasadena Office (tentative)

300 N. Lake Ave. Suite 920

Pasadena, CA  91101

 

YOUR RETIREMENT CHECKLIST AND LTC/LI HYBRIDS

Saturday, July 20, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Ken Nakaoka Center*

1670 W. 162nd St.,

Gardena, CA  90247

*not sponsored by the City of Gardena

 

INVESTING AFTER AGE 70.5 AND RMDs

Saturday, September 7, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

South Pasadena Public Library Community Room**

1115 El Centro St.

South Pasadena, CA  91030

**This activity is not sponsored by the City of South Pasadena or the South Pasadena Public Library

 

INVESTING AFTER AGE 70.5 AND RMDs

Saturday, September 14, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Ken Nakaoka Center*

1670 W. 162nd St.,

Gardena, CA  90247

*not sponsored by the City of Gardena

 

 

Contact Us

300 North Lake Avenue, Suite 920
Pasadena, California 91101
Phone: (626) 449-7783
Fax: (626) 449-7785
Email: info@kondowealthadvisors.com

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