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Articles by Alan & Akemi

EQUIFAX BREACH

These days it’s harder than ever to protect our personal information.  I get phishing emails daily alerting me I am the lucky lotto winner in a foreign country – all I need to do is send my bank information to have the proceeds deposited into my account.  Those scams are pretty straight forward.  While the everyday person might not have all the right security measures in place to protect themselves, we assume the big businesses and government do – they have a whole IT department that focuses on that kind of stuff, right?

Apparently, not so.  This month, we found out that Equifax, one of the nation’s three major credit reporting agencies had a data breach that lasted from mid-May through July in 2017[i].  During that time, hackers accessed personal information data including names, social security numbers, dates of birth and addresses.  The data breach affects as many as 143 million people[ii] in the US, Canada and United Kingdom.  In the wrong hands, this data could be used by identity thieves to rack up debt in your name and potentially ruin your credit. 

A week after the Equifax breach, the Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC), the nation’s top financial markets regulator, admitted it had also been a victim of computer hacking.  Although just recently discovered, the data breach occurred in 2016.  The top securities regulator said hackers accessed corporations’ financial information before it was made public (financial statements, quarterly earnings reports, IPOs, mergers and acquisitions, etc.) in its’ corporate filing system EDGAR (Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis and Retrieval).  According to the SEC, that data could have been used to make “illicit gains” through stock trades[iii].  Somewhat ironic, the SEC had been pressuring investment advisors and broker dealers to beef up their cybersecurity protections.  At the same time, the Government Accountability Office which audits the SEC found that the organization had not implemented 11 of 58 security recommendations related to its own computer network that would have helped to detect intrusion[iv].  

Am I at risk?

You can visit the Equifax website, www.equifaxsecurity2017.com to find out if your information was exposed.  Under the “Potential Impact” tab, you will be asked to enter your last name and the last six digits of your Social Security number.  The site will tell you if you’ve been affected by this breach.  

If Equifax feels your data was compromised they will encourage you to enroll in TrustedID Premier, a credit file monitoring and identity theft protection program.  There are five types of credit monitoring offerings, complimentary.  You can customize which of the below services you want to utilize.  You will be asked for a great deal of personal information so make sure you are on a secure computer and encrypted network connection. Credit monitoring options include:

1.      Equifax Credit Report – Copies of your Equifax Credit Report.

2.      3 Bureau Credit File Monitoring – Credit file monitoring and automated alerts of key changes to your Equifax, Experian and TransUnion credit files.

3.      Equifax Credit Report Lock – Allows you to prevent access to your Equifax credit report by third parties, with certain exceptions.

4.      Social Security Number Monitoring – Searches suspicious web sites for your Social Security number. 

5.      $1M Identity Theft Insurance – Up to $1 million in ID theft insurance. Helps pay for certain out-of-pocket expenses in the event you are a victim of identity theft.

After signing up for TrustedID Premier, you will receive an email with a link to finalize your enrollment and activate your customized security protection.  Due to the recent breach, traffic to the Equifax website is quite high and they warn it might take several days before the confirmation email arrives in your inbox.  

In a highly criticized move, Equifax added an arbitration clause to the free credit monitoring service that required users to give up their right to sue or join class-action lawsuits.  Due to public backlash and social-media shaming, the arbitration clause was rescinded[v].  

What else can I do?

If after visiting the Equifax website, you are told your data was not compromised, US consumers still have the option to obtain one year of free credit monitoring.  Due to high volume on the website currently, you will be given a date to come back to enroll in the future.  You have up until November 21, 2017 to enroll for this benefit.  

Other steps you might consider to protect yourself could include the following:

  • Placing a credit freeze on your files – A credit freeze locks your credit file with a PIN that must be used for anyone to add new credit in your name.  The freeze won’t stop someone from fraudulently charging to your existing credit lines.  You will have to enroll with each of the three credit agencies individually to initiate the freeze.
  • Active monitoring – Above and beyond annual credit report reviews, you should also monitor your existing credit cards and bank accounts regularly and question any charges you don’t recognize.
  • If you have minor children, consider checking their credit history regularly.  It is counterintuitive because minors should not be issued debt.  However, some young adults have applied for their “first” credit card, only to find their credit is shot because identity thieves have been using their social security for years, undetected.
  • File IRS taxes early – The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) recommends you file your tax return as early as possible to avoid tax identity theft which occurs when someone uses your social security to collect your tax refund before you do.  The FTC recommends that you respond to any IRS notifications timely, but remember that the IRS only sends letters.  They do not call you and ask for your personal information.

This commentary on this website reflects the personal opinions, viewpoints and analyses of the Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  employees providing such comments, and should not be regarded as a description of advisory services provided by Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  or performance returns of any Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  Investments client. The views reflected in the commentary are subject to change at any time without notice. Nothing on this website constitutes investment advice, performance data or any recommendation that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. Any mention of a particular security and related performance data is not a recommendation to buy or sell that security. Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc. manages its clients’ accounts using a variety of investment techniques and strategies, which are not necessarily discussed in the commentary. Investments in securities involve the risk of loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.


[i] www.consumer.ftc.gov

[ii] http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-sec-hack-20170921-story.html

[iii] https://www.sec.gov/news/press-release/2017-170

[iv] http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-sec-hack-20170921-story.html

[v] http://www.latimes.com/business/lazarus/la-fi-lazarus-equifax-arbitration-clauses-20170912-story.html

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HOW CAN I PROTECT MY FAMILY?

Lately we’ve noticed an increased interest in life insurance.  Client’s ask: When should I buy it?  Why do I need it? When is it too late?  I attribute some of the increased interest to the demographic shift as Generation X’ers (those born between 1965 and 1976) begin to think about estate planning and Generation Y’ers or Millennials (those born between 1977 and 1995) are starting families of their own.

Risk Factors

There are three main risks that life insurance aims to address.  Not coincidentally, these are the three biggest risks to the Gen XY groups mentioned.  The first risk is income replacement, as many want to ensure that their spouse or partner are financially stable should they pass away prematurely.  

The second risk is debt coverage.  Debt, or the idea of leveraging money, has become engrained in the American culture.  With the high cost of homes, cars, college and kids, it is nearly impossible to be debt free in today’s age.  The average American carries $137,000 in debt[i], mostly attributable to home mortgage debt.  In L.A. County, the median home price is $550,000[ii].  Life insurance can play a vital role in providing peace of mind that your family can stay in their home, even if you aren’t around.  

Another common concern is education or financial support for children.  A college degree is often a minimum requirement for employment these days, and many kids go on to get upper level education or specialization thereafter.  The average cost of attending a UC school for California residents is currently $34,700 per year and $61,444 for non-residents[iii].  To add to that headache, education costs increase at an average of 6% annually, or about double the general inflation rate[iv].  Life insurance can ensure your children will have education funding until they are financially independent. 

When should I buy?

Timing tends to work itself out organically for each person.  When I bought a house, I knew I should consider life insurance.  When I had my second child, I knew I was taking on more risk than I was comfortable with, so I purchased a life insurance policy.  

Life insurance premium pricing is carefully constructed by actuaries, but generally, it's based on age and health. The older you get, the more expensive a policy becomes. You also want to insure before you have a serious medical illness that would make you uninsurable or make a policy too expensive.  

Depending on the type or severity of illness, some insurers will still consider you for insurance after a significant health change after you show two years of stable health with medication or recovery without reoccurrence, but each case is independently analyzed.  

Theoretically, some insurers will insure a person in good health up to their 80’s, but the cost benefit analysis of the policy then comes into play and the policy might not be worth the premium payment.

Term or Permanent Insurance?

Term and permanent insurances have different purposes.  Term gives you the greatest leverage of your money, dollar for dollar, and is usually used to cover a time sensitive risk such as a mortgage. Permanent insurance protects against premature death as well, but can also be used as an estate planning tool because the intent is to hold the policy until you pass away, rather than to cover a temporary risk.  

Permanent insurance such as Whole Life, Universal Life and Variable Universal Life have features that can cater to a variety of needs.  In recent years, the cost of insurance (COI) within Universal Life policies have increased, causing policyholders to pay more in premiums than originally anticipated.  

One of the best ways to shop for life insurance is through an independent agent who is not tied to a company, but rather, can shop the entire market and quote the policy that best suits your needs.  Certified Financial Planners and CPAs are Fiduciaries, meaning they have pledged to act ethically in the client’s best interest, and can recommend a company or policy for you.   

What else should I consider?

Another tool to protect the assets you’ve worked hard for is a living will and trust.  People often think they are one and the same, but they serve different purposes and can work together well. A living will is for medical affairs and allows you to state wishes for care in case you are not able to communicate your decisions.  A trust takes effect as soon as you create it, and can be utilized to hold title of property for the future benefit of your loved ones.  After you pass, a trust does not need to go through the timely and expensive probate process and the settlement of your estate is private.  An attorney can assist you in customizing a will and trust.

Your attorney can also bundle your living trust with a durable power of attorney, with which you can authorize someone to act on your behalf if you become incapacitated.  Ensure it is HIPAA compliant so doctors, hospitals and medical staff will communicate with your designated person.

This commentary on this website reflects the personal opinions, viewpoints and analyses of the Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  employees providing such comments, and should not be regarded as a description of advisory services provided by Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  or performance returns of any Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  Investments client. The views reflected in the commentary are subject to change at any time without notice. Nothing on this website constitutes investment advice, performance data or any recommendation that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. Any mention of a particular security and related performance data is not a recommendation to buy or sell that security. Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc. manages its clients’ accounts using a variety of investment techniques and strategies, which are not necessarily discussed in the commentary. Investments in securities involve the risk of loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.


[i] https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/average-credit-card-debt-household/

[ii] http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-home-prices-20170523-story.html

[iii] http://admission.universityofcalifornia.edu/paying-for-uc/tuition-and-cost/index.html

[iv] http://www.finaid.org/savings/tuition-inflation.phtml

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Little-Known IRA Penalty Could Cost A Lot

A 2015 ruling by the Tax Court can affect your flexibility in moving from one Individual Retirement Account (IRA) to another, and it's still catching people by surprise today. It's easy to become confused, because the Internal Revenue System's own Publication 590 took awhile to catch up with the new ruling and gave contradictory recommendations. It's important to understand the stricter interpretation of the law, because making a mistake can subject you to unnecessary taxes and penalties, and could cause you to lose your IRA.

A couple of years ago, moving money from one IRA to another was fairly straight-forward, as long as you followed the "60-day rule". What this meant was, you could withdraw money from an IRA, but as long as you deposited the money into another IRA within 60 days, you would not be taxed on the distribution, and your money would continue to grow tax-deferred in the new IRA. This gave valuable flexibility to many people -- they could take money out of their IRAs and use for 60 days tax-free. If they put it back into an IRA within 60 days, it was like it never even happened. 

Before 2015, the understanding was that you could apply the "60-day rule" to multiple IRAs in the same year. Let's say you have $50,000 in IRA 1, and $100,000 in IRA 2. You decide to liquidate the $50,000 IRA, and within 60 days, you put it back into another IRA. Later that year, you liquidate the $100,000 IRA. Same as with the first IRA, you deposit the money back into an IRA within 60 days. No taxes, and no penalties. 

That was under the old rules. Unfortunately, the Tax Court felt this was a loophole they needed to close. Now, you can only apply the "60-day rule" to ONE IRA within a 12-month period, no matter how many IRAs you have. Using the same scenario above, the first IRA transfer of $50,000 would be allowed, but the second IRA transfer of $100,000 would be disallowed. The IRA owner would have to pay tax on $100,000, and the IRA would come to an end. To make matters worse, the IRA owner could also incur a 6% annual penalty for excess contributions because annual IRA contributions are limited to $5,500 ($6,500 if you're over 50 or older). The penalty would continue until the excess contribution was corrected.

You should also be aware that there are many different types of IRAs -- there are Traditional IRAs, Roth IRAs, SEP IRAs, and SIMPLE IRAs. Among all of these IRAs, only ONE rollover can occur every 12 months, NOT one rollover for each type of account.

The good news is that there is a way to move from one IRA to another IRA that avoids the restrictions and penalties. It's called a "trustee-to-trustee" (also known as a "custodian-to-custodian" transfer). Every IRA has a trustee or custodian.  The trustee-to-trustee transfer is not considered a distribution because the IRA owner doesn't have direct access to the money. And because it's not considered a distribution, it's not subject to the only-1-per-12-month limit. 

The trustee-to-trustee transfer is best done by direct transfer. This means the money goes directly from Trustee A to Trustee B and never touches your hands. From the IRS' point of view, this is clearly not a taxable issue. Another way to do the trustee-to-trustee transfer is to have the check written payable to the trustee. For example, the check might read "Payable to Charles Schwab, custodian FBO Your Name." FBO means "For the Benefit Of." Unlike the IRA-to-IRA rollover, there are no limits on the number of trustee-to-trustee transfers that can be made each year.

Because the consequences can be dire if you make a mistake, and there is little recourse once you've made an error, it may be wise to consult with a CPA or Certified Financial Planner™ when you want to do an IRA rollover or transfer.

This commentary on this website reflects the personal opinions, viewpoints and analyses of the Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  employees providing such comments, and should not be regarded as a description of advisory services provided by Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  or performance returns of any Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  Investments client. The views reflected in the commentary are subject to change at any time without notice. Nothing on this website constitutes investment advice, performance data or any recommendation that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. Any mention of a particular security and related performance data is not a recommendation to buy or sell that security. Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc. manages its clients’ accounts using a variety of investment techniques and strategies, which are not necessarily discussed in the commentary. Investments in securities involve the risk of loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

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Penalties Retirees Can Avoid

For those of you who are contemplating retiring soon, you will be joining the approximately 10,000 Baby Boomers who are turning age 65 every day. By 2060, there will be 98 million Americans age 65 or older, making up 25 percent of the general population.¹

This large group of retirees will have to make many important decisions. You only get one chance to make some of these decisions. The errors can be costly, but are easily avoided. I'd like to explore some of these danger areas, as well as ways to stay out of trouble.

DON'T CLAIM SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFITS TOO EARLY

Although it's possible to start receiving Social Security benefits as early as age 62, it might not be the best thing to do, depending on your circumstances. When you start taking Social Security benefits at age 62, you receive a reduced level of benefits permanently for your lifetime. This is because you're triggering benefits before your Full Retirement Age. If you were born between 1943 and 1954, your Full Retirement Age is 66. If your birthday falls between 1955 and 1959, your Full Retirement Age is 66-67. Finally, those born in 1960 or later have a Full Retirement Age of 67. 

As a rough rule-of-thumb, your Social Security benefits increase by about 8% for every year that you wait to start benefits. Therefore, if you start Social Security at age 67, your benefit will be about 40% higher than if you started it at age 62. This can make a significant difference in your lifestyle if you live a long time.

If you wait to age 70 to collect Social Security, your benefit will be about 64% higher compared to age 62. However, it doesn't pay to wait beyond age 70, because there are no increases after that point.

ENROLL IN MEDICARE AT THE RIGHT TIME

If you're already enrolled in Social Security and you're approaching age 65, you will automatically receive your Medicare card 3 months before your 65th birthday, and your coverage will start at the beginning of the month in which you turn 65. 

However, if you have not yet started Social Security when you turn 65, you have to remember to enroll yourself. You have to do it within a six-month window, starting 3 months before your turn 65, to 3 months afterwards. It's best to pay a visit to your Social Security office 3 months before your turn 65, so your coverage can start as soon as you turn 65. 

If you miss the six-month Initial Enrollment Period window, you will pay a penalty of 10% of the Part B premium for every year that you delay. This penalty is permanent, for as long as you receive Medicare.

DON'T FORGET TO TAKE YOUR REQUIREMENT MINIMUM DISTRIBUTION (RMD)

Want to avoid a 50% penalty? Don't forget to take your annual Required Minimum Distribution, starting at age 70 ½. If you don't take your RMD like you're supposed to, the IRS can take 50% of what you were supposed to take. 

This rule applies to the money in your retirement accounts, like Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs), employer-sponsored plans like 401(k)s and 403(b)s, and those created by self-employed individuals, like Simplified Employee Pensions (SEPs). Because the Internal Revenue Service wants to collect taxes on this money, it requires you to start taking out some money (and being taxed) from these accounts every year starting at age 70 ½. 

The annual RMD is not a large amount, about 4% at age 70 ½. For example, if you were age 70 ½ this year, you would take the cumulative value of all of your retirement accounts on December 31, 2016, and divide this sum by a denominator based on your age. At age 70 ½ the denominator is 27.4, making your RMD about 4%. In reality, your investment management company or Certified Financial Planner™ should do this calculation for you each year, and make sure you receive your distribution before the end of each year. 

Fortunately, the rest of your money can continue to grow, tax-deferred. Many people are under the impression that once they turn 70 ½, the value of their retirement accounts will dwindle each year. This is certainly possible if you have your retirement accounts in a bank savings account or CD. If you have to take out 4% or more each year, and the account is earning 1% or less, the balance will eventually disappear. However, in a broad, globally-diversified portfolio of investments, it's very possible to get an average return higher than 4% per year. Even though you have to take Required Minimum Distributions, you retirement accounts can still grow. Potentially, you can pay for your retirement expenses and still leave a legacy for your children or grandchildren.

Of course, the best choice for you on these decisions depends on your personal circumstances and goals. Consult with your CPA, Certified Financial Planner™, or estate planning attorney for advice when you are entering retirement. They can help you make the right decisions to maintain your lifestyle in retirement, and avoid needless penalties and taxes.

¹ Population Reference Bureau 1/2016

This commentary on this website reflects the personal opinions, viewpoints and analyses of the Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  employees providing such comments, and should not be regarded as a description of advisory services provided by Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  or performance returns of any Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  Investments client. The views reflected in the commentary are subject to change at any time without notice. Nothing on this website constitutes investment advice, performance data or any recommendation that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. Any mention of a particular security and related performance data is not a recommendation to buy or sell that security. Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc. manages its clients’ accounts using a variety of investment techniques and strategies, which are not necessarily discussed in the commentary. Investments in securities involve the risk of loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

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Aren't Record Highs a Good Thing?

I hope you are enjoying the dog days of summer!  Global stock markets delivered robust gains in the second quarter of 2017 as stronger earnings growth, upswings in global economic data and diminished political uncertainty in Europe all buoyed markets around the world.  The S&P 500 rose 3.1%[i] while domestic economic data continued to plug along at a healthy, if not exciting, pace.  It’s wonderful to have positive economic data to reflect upon.  However, whether the headlines this week are about the new market high or a looming market correction, the most important takeaway is to stick to your long-term investment plan and concentrate on the big picture.

This week the Dow Jones Industrial, arguably the most frequently referenced stock market index in the world, reached an all-time high of 22,000.  Since the bottom of the recession in March 2009, the Dow has more than tripled in value, creating one of the strongest bull markets we’ve ever seen.  However, our current bull market reached a milestone 8 year run this March[ii].  While some are finally comforted to get back into the market, others are warning that the sky is falling and to lock in gains while you can.  While a typical market timer might move from stocks into bonds when they expect the market to pull back, other financial experts caution that bonds are the wrong move in a rising interest rate environment.  All the warnings and predictions make the initial exuberant Dow record a frightening position to be in.  

So what do you do? 

My father and mentor, Alan Kondo, has always liked the adage, “The market timer’s Hall of Fame is an empty room.”  It’s true that an 8 year bull market does give rise to concern.  However, perfectly timing the top of the market so you can sell to lock in gains and then predicting the exact time to reenter the market before it picks up again is as likely as winning the lotto – twice in a row.  

What has historically worked more effectively to provide reliable returns and protect your nest egg is to create a long-term investment plan that you can stick to, in both good and bad markets.  Construct a balanced portfolio of equities and fixed income (bonds) that will capture market growth when it occurs, but also provide you a measured amount of downside protection if the market has a pull-back.  The exact weighting of equities to fixed income depends on a variety of factors like your retirement date, the return you hope to achieve annually and your personal risk tolerance.  A Certified Financial Planner™ can help you customize an asset allocation that is tailored to you.  

Success in Short-Term Fixed Income

For some, fixed income has been a difficult component to keep in their portfolio during the last 8 years as equities have climbed at a remarkable pace.  Further, with rising interest rates and inflation, long-term bonds may have a difficult road ahead.  We should be mindful of how we invest in fixed income these days.  The Federal Reserve has already increased interest rates twice this year and four times since 2015[iii], signaling that they believe the economy is still strong.  That means you don’t want to lock in a 10 year Treasury at 2.25% now if the going rate is going to be 2.50% by year-end and even higher next year.  Instead, now is the time to invest in short-term fixed income, with maturities of less than 5 years and preferably 1-3 years.  Employ a laddering strategy where multiple bonds are purchased, each with different maturity dates.  Having short-term laddered fixed income means that each quarter, some of the bonds in your portfolio or bond fund will mature.  The matured bonds will be replaced with new short-term fixed income at the going market interest rate, allowing your fixed income fund to keep up with rising interest rates and still provide you downside protection if the equity market dips.  

Why Market Pullbacks are Good

A market pullback is defined as a temporary market decline in what was otherwise an upward trend in the stock market.  Some are claiming that a market pullback is on the horizon that will wipe out the Trump Rally[iv] which has amounted to a whopping 3,000 points on the Dow since President Trump took office last November.  A market correction can be as much as a 10% decline, but it’s important to remember that market corrections happen often and are actually indicative of a healthy stock market.  Just as the economy has peaks and valleys, so too does the stock market.  When the market goes too long without a correction, the risk of stock prices deterring too far from their actual value grows.  

Keeping a big picture perspective, in a 20 or 30 year investment window, a market correction is hardly a blip on the retirement radar.  So if you have set up a good investment allocation, let your investment ride out that temporary trough and get back on track.   Don’t sweat the small stuff.  

In the last 20 years, the S&P 500 returned an annual average of 7.68%.  However, during that same window of time, the average U.S. stock investor earned just 4.79%. That is an almost 3% difference each year[v].  Mostly this is the detriment of market timing and locking in lows due to panic.  Many investors are smart people who could do a good job at investing their retirement funds if they dedicated themselves to it full-time.  The benefit of a good financial advisor is the experience, objective advice and guidance that can help keep investors on track and stop them from potentially cutting their long-term returns in half.  

This commentary on this website reflects the personal opinions, viewpoints and analyses of the Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  employees providing such comments, and should not be regarded as a description of advisory services provided by Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  or performance returns of any Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  Investments client. The views reflected in the commentary are subject to change at any time without notice. Nothing on this website constitutes investment advice, performance data or any recommendation that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. Any mention of a particular security and related performance data is not a recommendation to buy or sell that security. Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc. manages its clients’ accounts using a variety of investment techniques and strategies, which are not necessarily discussed in the commentary. Investments in securities involve the risk of loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.


[i] http://www.marketwatch.com

[ii] http://fortune.com/2017/03/09/stock-market-bull-market-longest/

[iii] http://www.npr.org

[iv] https://www.cnbc.com/2017/03/24/a-health-care-bill-setback-may-create-a-great-buying-opportunity-raymond-james.html

[v] http://360.loringward.com/rs/303-IYC-235/images/Blog_Don%27t_Just_Do_Something.pdf

 

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EDUCATIONAL WORKSHOPS

2019 SCHEDULE 

YOUR 2019 INVESTMENT STRATEGY

Saturday, March 16, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

South Pasadena Public Library Community Room**

1115 El Centro St.

South Pasadena, CA  91030

**This activity is not sponsored by the City of South Pasadena or the South Pasadena Public Library

 

YOUR 2019 INVESTMENT STRATEGY

Saturday, March 23, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Ken Nakaoka Center*

1670 W. 162nd St.,

Gardena, CA  90247

*not sponsored by the City of Gardena

 

HELP YOUR CHILDREN WITH FINANCES

Saturday, May 4, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Ken Nakaoka Center*

1670 W. 162nd St.,

Gardena, CA  90247

*Not sponsored by the City of Gardena

 

HELP YOUR CHILDREN WITH FINANCES

Saturday, May 11, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

South Pasadena Public Library Community Room**

1115 El Centro St.,

South Pasadena, CA  91030

**This activity is not sponsored by the City of South Pasadena or the South Pasadena Public Library

 

YOUR RETIREMENT CHECKLIST AND LTC/LI HYBRIDS

Saturday, July 13, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Kondo Wealth Advisors Pasadena Office (tentative)

300 N. Lake Ave. Suite 920

Pasadena, CA  91101

 

YOUR RETIREMENT CHECKLIST AND LTC/LI HYBRIDS

Saturday, July 20, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Ken Nakaoka Center*

1670 W. 162nd St.,

Gardena, CA  90247

*not sponsored by the City of Gardena

 

INVESTING AFTER AGE 70.5 AND RMDs

Saturday, September 7, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

South Pasadena Public Library Community Room**

1115 El Centro St.

South Pasadena, CA  91030

**This activity is not sponsored by the City of South Pasadena or the South Pasadena Public Library

 

INVESTING AFTER AGE 70.5 AND RMDs

Saturday, September 14, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Ken Nakaoka Center*

1670 W. 162nd St.,

Gardena, CA  90247

*not sponsored by the City of Gardena

 

 

Contact Us

300 North Lake Avenue, Suite 920
Pasadena, California 91101
Phone: (626) 449-7783
Fax: (626) 449-7785
Email: info@kondowealthadvisors.com

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