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Understanding Medicare A, B, C & D

UNDERSTANDING MEDICARE A, B, C & D

If you are approaching age 65, you have a lot of company. There are 75 million Baby Boomers on the verge of retirement. Over the next twenty years, an average of 10,000 each day will reach age 65.¹ And when you turn 65, you have to apply to Medicare.

Medicare contains four components: Parts A, B, C, and D. Each component contains many rules that beneficiaries and their caregivers are required to learn. Following are some of the main points you should know --

Medicare Part A: Hospital Insurance

This insurance is designed to help cover the following:

●  Inpatient care in hospitals, including rehabilitation facilities

●  Care provided in a skilled nursing facility or hospice for a limited period

●  Home health care

For inpatient hospital care, Medicare typically covers a semi-private room, meals, general nursing, drugs, and other hospital services and supplies. For Long Term Care, Medicare may cover a maximum of 100 days during a benefit period if a doctor certifies that a patient needs daily skilled care.

Cost: No premium if you or your spouse paid Medicare taxes while you were working. For 2015, there is a deductible of $1,260 before coverage begins. You may expect to pay a portion of the cost for a hospital stay of more than 60 days during a benefit period.

Medicare Part B: Medical Insurance

Part B helps to cover physician services, outpatient care, preventive services, durable medical equipment, and certain home health care. Although the scope of Part B is extensive, there are many services -- such as dental care, routine eye exams, hearing aids, and others -- that are not covered as part of this program.

Cost: A deductible of $147 for 2015 plus 20% of Medicare-approved amounts for medical services. With Original Medicare, the standard 2015 premium is $104.90 per month. Single beneficiaries with incomes above $85,000 and couples earning more than $170,000 pay higher premiums.

Medicare Part C: Offered by Private Insurers

Also known as Medicare Advantage plans, Part C consists of insurance plans provided by private carriers. Medicare pays a fixed amount every month to a private insurer for providing care. In return, Medicare Advantage plans include drug coverage, emergency and urgent care. Some plans may cover services that are not covered by Medicare, which may result in lower out-of-pocket fees for beneficiaries.

Cost varies according to the level of coverage. You should contact the plans that interest you to learn the details and to compare the costs and levels of coverage with Medicare Part A and Part B.

Medicare Part D: Prescription Drugs

If you have Original Medicare (Part A plus Part B), you can add drug coverage by obtaining it from an insurer approved by Medicare through Part D. Sign up for Part D as soon as you become eligible for Medicare. If you wait and try to sign up during a subsequent enrollment period, you may be charged a late enrollment penalty and be required to pay higher premiums for life.

Costs: There is a monthly premium, an annual deductible, and copayments. There is a coverage gap, commonly called the "donut hole" that works as follows: After a beneficiary and the insurer pay $2,860 for prescription drugs during a benefit period, the beneficiary will pay 47.5% of the plan's covered brand-name prescription drugs until out-of-pocket expenses total $4,700, at which point catastrophic coverage takes effect. Effective the following calendar year, a new benefit period begins with applicable premiums, copayments, and other costs.

Part D may be included if you have a Medicare Advantage plan. Find out whether your plan includes prescription coverage as part of its program.

Medicare's rules can be confusing for many people. Their website, www.medicare.gov, can be a valuable resource. Every year, Medicare also mails "Medicare & You" to beneficiaries and makes this fact-filled publication available online. You may want to review it to make sure you have an up-to-date understanding of the Medicare program.

¹  U.S. News & World Report 3/23/2012

This commentary on this website reflects the personal opinions, viewpoints and analyses of the Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  employees providing such comments, and should not be regarded as a description of advisory services provided by Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  or performance returns of any Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  Investments client. The views reflected in the commentary are subject to change at any time without notice. Nothing on this website constitutes investment advice, performance data or any recommendation that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. Any mention of a particular security and related performance data is not a recommendation to buy or sell that security. Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc. manages its clients’ accounts using a variety of investment techniques and strategies, which are not necessarily discussed in the commentary. Investments in securities involve the risk of loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

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Budget Deal Curbs Social Security Claiming Options

BUDGET DEAL CURBS SOCIAL SECURITY CLAIMING OPTIONS

In November 2015, President Obama signed into law H.R. 1314, more commonly referred to as the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015.  One significant byproduct of the legislation is the elimination or curbing of two social security filing strategies that married couples may have been planning to use to optimize their lifetime social security benefits.  The two programs include the “File and Suspend” and “Restricted Application” for spousal benefits filings.  As with most things related to federal programs, there's a great deal of complexity in the details.


What's at Stake?

File and SuspendThis is when an individual, who is at least at Full Retirement Age (age 66 for most claimants), files for his or her own retirement benefit and then immediately suspends receipt of those benefits with the social security office.  This sets a Filing Date under the individual’s record, which allows a spouse or dependent to then initiate benefit payments to be paid out to them based upon the filing individual’s record.  These auxiliary payments do not negatively affect the benefits to be received by the original filing individual.  In fact, since the individual suspended his or her own social security benefits, their future benefit is allowed to grow.  Between age 62 and 70, each year social security collection is delayed, benefit payments will increase by 6-8%.  This could potentially provide thousands of dollars in additional income to couples over their lifetimes.

Keep in mind that the original person must file first to enable the second person to file for spousal or dependent benefits.  After the initial filing, the original filer can continue to receive benefits or elect to suspend.  The suspension part is not necessary to enable the auxiliary benefits.  Suspending simply allows the original filers’ benefits to grow for a later payout date. 

Anytime between Full Retirement Age (FRA) and age 70, the individual could change their mind and “unsuspend” their benefits.  The Social Security office would retroactively pay out some or all of the suspended benefits in a lump sum. 

Under the Bipartisan Budget Act, starting May 1, 2016, your spouse and children will no longer be able to receive social security income on your suspended record and you will no longer be able to retroactively collect all past social security income if you elect to unsuspend.  If your payments are currently suspended, or if you request suspension before the upcoming May 2016 deadline, you will be grandfathered under the old rules.

Restricted Application – When an individual is at least FRA, has not filed for any previous benefits and has a spouse who has established a Filing Date (suspension does not matter), they may file a Restricted Application (RA) to receive ONLY the spousal benefit based upon the spouse’s record.  Collection of social security benefits under the Restricted Application does not affect the individuals’ own pool of benefits.  Therefore, this strategy allows one to collect spousal benefits and concurrently delay their own future retirement benefit so it may grow by the same 6-8% per year as mentioned above.  Upon reaching age 70, the individual would switch from the spousal benefit income to their own social security benefit, which in theory should be larger. 

Under the Bipartisan Budget Act, the Restricted Application filing is no longer available to anyone born Jan. 2, 1954, or later. It continues to be available for anyone born Jan. 1, 1954, or earlier.


Recap

-- For anyone younger than age 66 by May 1, 2016 (born after May 1, 1950), the File and Suspend method will no longer be available.

-- For anyone younger than age 62 by January 1, 2016 (born after January 1, 1954), Restricted Application is no longer available.


Window of Opportunity

For anyone younger than age 66 by May 1, 2016 (born after May 1, 1950), the File and Suspend method will be available up until May 1, 2016.  After such date, the filing method will be removed as an available option. 

Are you thoroughly confused?  Determining when and how to claim social security benefits has always been a challenging task, but these new rules create even more complexity for those nearing retirement.  If you are age 66 now, or will turn 66 within the next three months, definitely speak with your Certified Financial Planner™ or CPA about taking advantage of these claiming strategies before you lose the option to do so.


Source/Disclaimer:

Financial Ducks in a Row, “File & Suspend and Restricted Application are NOT Equal”

Market Watch, "Millions of Americans just lost a key Social Security strategy"

Market Watch, “New Social Security Rules Change Claiming Strategies”

U.S. News & World Report, "How the Budget Deal Changes Social Security"

Wall Street Journal “A Strategy to Maximize Social Security Benefits”

This commentary on this website reflects the personal opinions, viewpoints and analyses of the Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  employees providing such comments, and should not be regarded as a description of advisory services provided by Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  or performance returns of any Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  Investments client. The views reflected in the commentary are subject to change at any time without notice. Nothing on this website constitutes investment advice, performance data or any recommendation that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. Any mention of a particular security and related performance data is not a recommendation to buy or sell that security. Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc. manages its clients’ accounts using a variety of investment techniques and strategies, which are not necessarily discussed in the commentary. Investments in securities involve the risk of loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

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Short-Term Volatility, Long-Term Gains for 2016

SHORT-TERM VOLATILITY, LONG-TERM GAINS FOR 2016

Last year, we saw an unusual market that seemed split in two. The U.S. market was relatively stable because the U.S. economy continued to do well. Corporations made good profits. The housing market had good gains, with analysts predicting that it would continue to grow for another four years. As a result, construction hit record numbers. Lower gas prices at the pump put more money in people's pockets and stimulated growth. Nevertheless, the U.S. market was negatively affected by overseas uncertainty. The Dow Jones Industrial Average, a basket of thirty large U.S. companies, ended the year losing 2.2%. The Standard and Poors 500, representing the 500 largest U.S. companies, fell 0.7%.¹

The international market encountered one challenge after another. It started over a year ago, with Russia's invasion of Ukraine. This was followed by the Greek debt crisis, then the slowdown of growth in China, and finally the terrorist attack in Paris. International market performance mirrored this volatility. Many analysts were surprised that after a roller-coaster year, the Shanghai composite index ended the year up 9.4%, and the Stoxx European index closed up 6.8%.² The lesson is that even during a period of heightened volatility, long-term gains can be quite good.

In 2016, markets will experience continued short-term volatility, as we have seen with the January 3rd drop in reaction to slowed growth in China. In the long-term, however, we are apt to see continued growth in Europe as a result of lower interest rates implemented late last year. China should stabilize as well, as it shifts its economy from one fueled by trading with other countries, to one that is driven more by internal consumer spending, similar to the U.S. Although China's growth has slowed to 6.3%, this is still twice the U.S. growth rate, and is a more sustainable number.

Last year, the U.S. market experienced uncertainty over when the Federal Reserve Bank would begin to raise interest rates. Fortunately, this is now behind us. Janet Yellen, the chair of the Federal Reserve Bank, raised interest rates by ¼% in December. She will probably continue to implement small increases over 2016. This should have a minimal impact on market returns, since interest rate increases have been anticipated for over a year, and the impact is already priced into the market.

This will be a year to avoid high-yield or "junk" bonds and long-maturity bonds. This is because investors tend to move their money out of riskier investments like high-yield bonds if they can get a decent interest rate in safer investments like Treasuries. They are also inclined to move money out of long-maturity bonds in a rising interest rate environment because they don't want to be locked into low-interest investments.

History has shown that the best-performing asset class doesn't hold the position very long, and changes quickly. U.S. large company investments, like the Standard and Poors 500 index, have had a good run since the bottom of the recession in March 2009. It's possible that in the coming period, U.S. small companies may start to do better than U.S. large companies.

International investments are also overdue for a rally. In 2000, when international was the worst-performing asset class, many investors were impatient and sold their international holdings. In just a couple of years, international went all the way from the bottom to the top, and held that position for nearly a decade. It pays to not let yourself be thrown off course by by the emotion of the moment.

The uncertainty over who will be elected president this year, and which party will come into power, will probably be reflected in increased market volatility up until the elections. The market likes a balance between the parties, because tax laws and government policy are unlikely to change very drastically. This is likely to be the case in this election, and the market following the elections may be characterized by greater stability and smoother growth.

One of the more reliable strategies in a volatile market is to build a portfolio that is just the opposite of "putting all your eggs in one basket." It's difficult to guess the best-performing asset class for the year, even for research firms that study investments 24/7 with analysts stationed around the world. When you have a globally diversified portfolio that balances all of the available asset classes, no matter which asset class is performing well, you will have some assets in that asset class and benefit from its good performance.

Although 2015 was a down year in general for the market, it was far better than the 40% dive that the Standard and Poors 500 took in 2008 when the country was in financial crisis. We know the market never goes up in straight line, and a year of poor performance is normal. The market can be unpredictable in the short-term, but the long-term performance is impressive. Today, the Dow Jones Industrial Average is 17,159. In January 2009 it was 8,953. Taking advantage of the market's long-term potential is one of the better ways to beat inflation and accomplish your family's most important goals.

¹ Wall Street Journal 12/31/2015

² Wall Street Journal 1/3/2016

This commentary on this website reflects the personal opinions, viewpoints and analyses of the Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  employees providing such comments, and should not be regarded as a description of advisory services provided by Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  or performance returns of any Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  Investments client. The views reflected in the commentary are subject to change at any time without notice. Nothing on this website constitutes investment advice, performance data or any recommendation that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. Any mention of a particular security and related performance data is not a recommendation to buy or sell that security. Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc. manages its clients’ accounts using a variety of investment techniques and strategies, which are not necessarily discussed in the commentary. Investments in securities involve the risk of loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

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How Rising Interest Rates Might Affect Your Stock Investments?

In a long anticipated move, the Federal Reserve raised its target federal funds rate on Wednesday December 16th to a range of 0.25 to 0.5 percent.  This is the first increase since June 29, 2006. 

The Federal Reserve's actions have a marked influence on the economy and financial markets. Some market analysts believe that the Fed's massive, multi-year bond-buying program coupled with a record-setting period of near-zero interest rates fueled the six-year bull market for stocks. Now investors are grappling with what a period of rising short-term rates will mean for their investment portfolios and retirement accounts.1

While many market watchers have speculated about the effect of rising rates, history provides a window into how stocks have reacted to such policy shifts in the past.

A Look Back

Research looking at the past 35 years (and six rate-hiking cycles) found that stocks don't necessarily follow a straight path up or down in reaction to a rate hike.  Instead, they present a mixed bag of performance.  For

instance, analysis reported on CNBC.com found that in two of the six cycles, stocks, as represented by the S&P 500, were lower a year after the initial rate hike.  Even so, the average gain for all six periods was 2.6%.  On

average, a year and a half after the first rate hike in a cycle, the market was up 14.4%.2

What's Different This Time?

While heightened volatility is often a byproduct of the Federal Reserve initiating a rate hiking cycle, there are unique variables at play this time that may help to lessen the market's reaction.

First, the federal funds rate was set at 0% to 0.25% for nearly the past seven years -- far below its starting point for the previous several rate hiking cycles -- it is believed that the Fed has a lot of leeway to move rates up

before creating a significant drag on the economy.  Second, Fed Chairwoman Janet Yellen has reiterated over and over again that the rate hike will be gradual in the coming years in an attempt to minimize market

disruption.3

Considerations for Investors

Given the inevitability of the interest rate hike, you may be cautious in your outlook for your investment portfolio.  However, don't let your emotions get in the way of potential investment opportunities.  Consider

discussing the following strategies with your Certified Financial Planner ™ or financial advisor at your next meeting.

  • Dollar Cost Averaging -- If stocks dip each time the Fed announces interest rate increases, many analysts feel the drops will be short-lived and may in fact prove to be a good time to selectively add to your portfolio.  On a long term basis, a systematic purchasing plan, also known as dollar cost averaging, can help in volatile times.  Dollar Cost Averaging creates a systematic purchase schedule over a period of time, taking the guesswork out of specific timing of purchases.4  The advantage of this method is you’re buying less stocks when the prices are high and more when the market dips and stocks are priced at a “bargain.”

  • Consider high-quality dividend stocks -- Equity investors looking to limit volatility may want to consider an income-producing strategy via dividend-paying stocks.  As we saw during the Great Recession, companies tend to continue issuing dividends regardless of the stock price, creating stability to the owner.  Although a company can potentially eliminate or reduce dividends at any time, a dividend may provide something in the way of a return (i.e., income plus any potential price appreciation) even when stock prices are volatile. 

  • Review sector allocations -- History supports the notion that Fed actions affect equity sectors in different ways.  For instance, in a rate-hiking cycle, defensive sectors, such as utilities, energy, and consumer staples have tended to perform better, as these sectors produce necessary goods and services that have less reliance on consumer discretionary spending.  In a rate-cutting cycle, leading sectors tend to be those that are more dependent on consumer spending, such as retail, autos, and construction.5

These are just a few of the strategies you may want to consider heading into a rate-hiking cycle.  Work with your Certified Financial Planner ™ or financial advisor to review your unique circumstances and make changes,

as deemed appropriate, for your situation.

Source/Disclaimer:

1Investing in stocks involves risks, including loss of principal.
2CNBC.com and Nuveen Asset Management, "When the Fed raises rates, here's what happens," September 17, 2015.

3CNBC.com, "Wall Street history says stocks can survive Fed rate hike," September 15, 2015.
4Dollar cost averaging involves regular, periodic investments in securities regardless of price levels. You should consider your financial ability to continue purchasing shares through periods of high and low prices. This plan does not assure a profit and does not protect against loss in any markets.

5Forbes, "How Rising Interest Rates Will Affect The Stock Market And Your Investments," May 19, 2015.

This commentary on this website reflects the personal opinions, viewpoints and analyses of the Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  employees providing such comments, and should not be regarded as a description of advisory services provided by Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  or performance returns of any Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  Investments client. The views reflected in the commentary are subject to change at any time without notice. Nothing on this website constitutes investment advice, performance data or any recommendation that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. Any mention of a particular security and related performance data is not a recommendation to buy or sell that security. Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc. manages its clients’ accounts using a variety of investment techniques and strategies, which are not necessarily discussed in the commentary. Investments in securities involve the risk of loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

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Year-End Tax Reduction Tips

Even though April 15 now seems a distant deadline for filing your 2015 tax returns, in order to take advantage of some of the biggest tax reduction strategies, you have to act before the end of this year. Here are three strategies that you may want to execute by December 31.

1. Maximize Contributions to Tax-Advantaged Accounts

Contributing to your employer's retirement plan is one of the smartest tax moves you can make. For 2015 (and 2016) you can shelter up to $18,000, or $24,000 if you are age 50 or older. Because contributions are typically made on a pretax basis, qualified plans such as 401(k)s and 403(b)s help to lower your current taxable income. Plus, the money in the account is allowed to grow tax deferred until you begin taking withdrawals, usually in retirement.¹

If you have maxed out contributions to your employer's plan, but want to save even more, consider funding a Roth IRA. You can contribute up to $5,500 in 2015 and 2016, or $6,500 if you are 50 or older. For many employees who are participating in an employer-sponsored retirement plan, contributing to a Roth IRA may be preferable to contributing to a Traditional IRA. This is because if your Adjusted Gross Income is $61,000 or more if you are single, or $98,000 or more if you are married and filing jointly, contributions to a Traditional IRA might not give you a tax deduction.

Even though you have until tax day -- April 15, 2016 -- to fund an IRA for 2015, why wait? Funding it by year-end potentially gives it all the more time to grow tax-deferred.

2. Consider Tax-Loss Harvesting

Tax-loss harvesting is the process of offsetting portfolio gains with losses to help minimize your exposure to capital gains tax. In a year like 2015, in which the stock market experienced a significant late-summer swoon, such a strategy may be particularly attractive.

Generally, the IRS allows you to offset capital gains with capital losses to the extent of your total gains. If you have no gains, you may be allowed to deduct up to $3,000 against ordinary income each year, thus potentially lowering your tax liability. Losses in excess of that limit can be carried over to the next year. To be sure you are doing this correctly, consult with your Certified Financial Planner™ or CPA.

Before you sell, consider the length of time you have held a security. Securities sold within a year of their purchase can generate short-term capital gains, which are taxed at the investor's ordinary income tax rate -- up to a maximum rate of 39.6% for the highest earning individuals.

Gains from the sale of securities held for more than one year are considered long-term gains and are taxed at a maximum rate of 15% for most Americans, but that rises to 20% for those with taxable incomes of over $400,000 ($450,000 for joint filers). In addition, the Medicare surtax on net investment income, which includes capital gains, results in an overall top long-term capital gains tax rate of 23.8% for high-income taxpayers.

The bottom line on tax-loss harvesting? If you are considering employing this strategy, evaluate carefully the investments you may select for sale, then discuss your plan with a trusted financial advisor.

3. Timing Is Everything

If you expect your taxable income to be higher than normal for the 2015 tax year, you may want to accelerate tax deductions and, where possible, to defer income. For instance, you could increase your charitable deductions or make advance payments for state and local taxes, insurance premiums, interest payments, medical procedures, or other deductible expenses for which you may be able to control the timing. Similarly, you may be able to delay some forms of discretionary income or hold on to stocks that have performed exceptionally well at least until early 2016, being mindful of what you expect your tax/income situation to be next year.

These are just some of the many steps you can take to help keep your taxes in check. Work with your financial and tax advisors to make tax planning an integral part of your overall financial plan.

This communication is not intended to be tax advice and should not be treated as such. Each individual's tax situation is different. You should contact your tax professional to discuss your personal situation.

¹ Withdrawals from traditional IRAs are taxed at then-current income tax rates. Withdrawals prior to age 59½ may be subject to an additional federal tax.

This commentary on this website reflects the personal opinions, viewpoints and analyses of the Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  employees providing such comments, and should not be regarded as a description of advisory services provided by Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  or performance returns of any Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc.  Investments client. The views reflected in the commentary are subject to change at any time without notice. Nothing on this website constitutes investment advice, performance data or any recommendation that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. Any mention of a particular security and related performance data is not a recommendation to buy or sell that security. Kondo Wealth Advisors, Inc. manages its clients’ accounts using a variety of investment techniques and strategies, which are not necessarily discussed in the commentary. Investments in securities involve the risk of loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

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EDUCATIONAL WORKSHOPS

2019 SCHEDULE 

YOUR 2019 INVESTMENT STRATEGY

Saturday, March 16, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

South Pasadena Public Library Community Room**

1115 El Centro St.

South Pasadena, CA  91030

**This activity is not sponsored by the City of South Pasadena or the South Pasadena Public Library

 

YOUR 2019 INVESTMENT STRATEGY

Saturday, March 23, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Ken Nakaoka Center*

1670 W. 162nd St.,

Gardena, CA  90247

*not sponsored by the City of Gardena

 

HELP YOUR CHILDREN WITH FINANCES

Saturday, May 4, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Ken Nakaoka Center*

1670 W. 162nd St.,

Gardena, CA  90247

*Not sponsored by the City of Gardena

 

HELP YOUR CHILDREN WITH FINANCES

Saturday, May 11, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

South Pasadena Public Library Community Room**

1115 El Centro St.,

South Pasadena, CA  91030

**This activity is not sponsored by the City of South Pasadena or the South Pasadena Public Library

 

YOUR RETIREMENT CHECKLIST AND LTC/LI HYBRIDS

Saturday, July 13, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Kondo Wealth Advisors Pasadena Office (tentative)

300 N. Lake Ave. Suite 920

Pasadena, CA  91101

 

YOUR RETIREMENT CHECKLIST AND LTC/LI HYBRIDS

Saturday, July 20, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Ken Nakaoka Center*

1670 W. 162nd St.,

Gardena, CA  90247

*not sponsored by the City of Gardena

 

INVESTING AFTER AGE 70.5 AND RMDs

Saturday, September 7, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

South Pasadena Public Library Community Room**

1115 El Centro St.

South Pasadena, CA  91030

**This activity is not sponsored by the City of South Pasadena or the South Pasadena Public Library

 

INVESTING AFTER AGE 70.5 AND RMDs

Saturday, September 14, 2019

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Ken Nakaoka Center*

1670 W. 162nd St.,

Gardena, CA  90247

*not sponsored by the City of Gardena

 

 

Contact Us

300 North Lake Avenue, Suite 920
Pasadena, California 91101
Phone: (626) 449-7783
Fax: (626) 449-7785
Email: info@kondowealthadvisors.com

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